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Beirut's Heritage Buildings

This guide aims to list some of Beirut's heritage buildings and provide resources to assist researchers with their needs on this specific topic.

An elegant traditional two-story, 4,800 square foot house completed in 1875 in the eastern Beirut neighborhood of Gemmayze, is an example of the late Ottoman and French Mandate houses of fin-de-siècle Lebanon with its façade of three arches and wide balconies. The house was badly damaged during the Beirut blast in August 2020.

                           Dagher residence

                          Source: Screenshot taken from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu9t_ypEt20

Saint Joseph University of Beirut (USJ), a private Lebanese University, was founded in 1875 by the Society of Jesus. Its Campus of Medical Sciences is located on Damascus Road and was established in 1883.                    No photo description available.

                   Source: https://www.facebook.com/usj.edu.lb/photos/a.281231478711815/657665624401730

Gouraud Street, named after French General Henri Gouraud, is full of narrow streets and historic buildings from the French era. The buildings on this street were heavily damaged in Beirut's blast of August 4, 2020.      

               Plate showing the heritage nature of Gouraud Street   

               Gouraud Street

               Source: https://travelhk.com/en/travel-detail-20317-scenic.html


Located on Gouraud Street, Gemmayze, Beit Tarazi (later known as Kassar mansion) was built in 1870 for a prominent Lebanese family in the final decades of the Ottoman Empire arranged over three floors.

                                            Beit Tarazi

                              Source: https://theconceptksblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/beitkassar-northfacadec2a9colombeclier.jpg?w=467&h=987

Built in 1890 and located near St. Joseph University, Tabet Palace is known for its magnificent garden. The palace is one of its kind in the area with its three-sided roof and beautiful openings.         

                       Tabet Palace               

                        Source: https://www.lebanoninapicture.com/pictures


Another beautiful old house on Huvelin Street.

                     No photo description available. 

                     Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=2309656702645143&set=gm.666904093746265

Dergham buildings, built in the 1930s, are located in Monot neighborhood. The demolition of this French Mandate-era apartment block was stopped in 2018 (for an unspecified period of time) by the intervention of APSAD and Save Beirut Heritage associations.

                        Dergham building

Source: https://www.facebook.com/SaveBeirutHeritage/posts/the-demolition-of-the-dergham-building-has-stoppedsave-beirut-heritage-and-the-a/1773395682721097/


Beautiful traditional houses on Monot Street.           

                         No photo description available.

                        Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=1144057445957308&set=pcb.982837995486205


                        No photo description available.

                       Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=1140808239615562&set=pcb.979945149108823


                       No photo description available.

                       Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=1140061926356860&set=pcb.979216402515031                  

The villa was built over several stages stretching from the late 1800s to the late 1920s. The building is a mixture of French Art Nouveau design and Ottoman influences previously owned by the Baloumian family. It was restored by artist Tom Young and the new owner Remi Feghali and was transformed into a cultural space.       

                        Villa Paradiso        

                           Source: http://www.levantineheritage.com/images/baloumian17.jpg                           

651 Mdawar is an Art Deco building in the middle of Gemmayze street that was banned from demolition in 2014 by Save Beirut Heritage, the Ministry of Culture, and the mayor of Beirut due to its high importance as architecture and on the street of Gemmayze one of the last remaining streets in Beirut with a semi-heritage urban aspect.    

                             651 Mdawar            

                            Source: https://www.facebook.com/SaveBeirutHeritage/photos/a.606210976106246/1301335629927107/?type=3&theater